Expectations


The sacred success mantra from The Bhagavad GITA

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This is good :-)


IMAGINE this. You’ve been

preparing for the most prestigious exam of your nation, The Civil Services Exam.
You know getting into that coveted services could make your life. Your
parents have been praying for this

day, hoping you get admission in LBSNAA. And
then when the entrance results are out, you find you haven’t made it.
What do you do?
Do you say “Oh, this is terrible. I

am doomed!”? Do you worry about it for a long time, and blame your luck and the circumstances that
conspired to keep you out? Or do
you say, “Wow, this is good!” and

move on?
What you say could actually make a difference to the rest of your life.
It is a good idea to believe that
whatever happens, happens for

good. That doesn’t change your
past, but it can dramatically alter
your future. It doesn’t help to
worry about things you cannot

change. Focus instead on what you can change.
When you get caught up in looking
back at your misfortune, you start looking for someone else to blame. And rather than working on picking up the pieces and building a new future, you start looking for excuses. When one door shuts, there is no point in banging your head against it.Look out instead for other doors that may be opening up. Next time you find

yourself in that situation, pause,

take a deep breath, and smile. And remind yourself about this story of an African king and his dear friend.
The king’s friend was a cheerful
person, very optimistic. Whenever something happened – good or bad

– the friend would remark, “This is good!” They would often go on
hunting expeditions, and the friend would help prepare the rifles for the king. One day, the friend made a mistake with one of the guns. When the king took that gun and pulled the trigger, his thumb got

blown off. Seeing what happened,
the friend remarked, “This is
good!” That infuriated the king and landed his friend in jail.
A few years hence, another hunting expedition took the king to a place, inhabited by cannibals. The cannibals caught him and began celebrating their upcoming feast.

The king’s hands were tied and he
was being washed to be put into a large earthen pot that was being readied for cooking. Just then,
someone noticed that the king had no thumb. As it happened, these cannibals were a superstitious lot.

They never ate anyone who was less than whole. So the king was set free.
As he headed back to his palace,
the king recalled the incident when he had lost his thumb. He realized his dear friend was right in saying,

“This is good!” Losing a thumb that
day had actually saved his life. He
quickly ordered his friend to be set free. He narrated to his friend

what had happened and apologized.
“I shouldn’t have put you in
prison,” said the king. “That was
bad!”
“No, no. This is good!” said the

friend. “What do you mean,” asked
the King. “How could sending you
to jail have been good?”
“Don’t you see?”said the friend, “If

I had not been in jail, I would have been out with you. And the
cannibals would then have killed
and eaten me!”
So, next time you find things are

not going your way, think of the
king’s thumb. And whatever
happens, just say, “This is good!”
Your world will be a better place.

None of us can control external
events. What happens can be good or bad. What you can control is
your response, your feelings. You
can choose to feel good or you can choose to feel bad. The choice is yours.

When you moan and say this is
bad, the mind gets conditioned to look for difficulty in opportunity.
And when you say this is good, the mind looks for opportunity in

difficulty. And therein lies the
difference between winners and
losers.
Just say ‘this is good’. It’s a good

mantra to live by…

PS: Kindly share wd ur colleagues!

Regards
Sumeet Mahendra
www.twitter.com/sumt7

Being Ram


DESTROY THE RAVANA WITHIN
The basic storyline of Ramayana is very similar to that of a typical
movie. Both feature a hero, a heroine and a villain; both depict the
villain lusting for the heroine; both delineate an exciting confrontation
between the hero and the villain, culminating in the destruction of the
villain and re-union of the hero and the heroine. However, there is one
vital difference – in the movie, the hero, the heroine and the villain are
all actually villains.
Many people think of a villain as a person who enjoys by exploiting and
harming others. Though not wrong, this conception of evil is incomplete
and naïve as it ignores a fundamental reality: our supremely responsible
and loving father God. Probably most of us never got spiritual education
to realize that it is God who selflessly provides us our daily food. It is true that we have to work
hard to earn our living, but our effort is secondary; its like the hard work of the birds searching
for grains. Without God pre-providing the grains through nature, their search, no matter how
painstaking, would be fruitless. Similarly without God pre-designing the miraculous mechanism of
photosynthesis which transforms “mud into mangoes” (a feat far beyond the best scientist and
the latest computer), we would never have any food, no matter how much we labored. All our
other necessities – heat, light, air, water, health – are similarly fulfilled – primarily by divine
arrangement, secondarily by human endeavor.
Unfortunately our education, media and culture preoccupy us with so many materialistic
allurements that we become blinded to the fact of our dependence and obligation to God. Fear
of God is the beginning of wisdom, just as healthy fear of a loving father is necessary for a
naughty restless child to become disciplined and responsible. And love of God is the culmination
of wisdom, just as gratitude and love for a benevolent father shows the maturity of a grown-up
son. Sadly however our society fosters neither love nor fear for God, but glamorizes godless
selfish materialism instead. Consequently nowadays many people are extremely selfish in their
relationship with God; they don’t give even a few moments to the person who has given them
their entire life. In a family, if a son doesn’t care for his father, who is his connecting link with
his brothers, very soon he will stop caring for them too. In fact he may even become malevolent
toward them because they become his competitors for inheritance. Similarly selfishness
towards God is the origin of all evil. We have all sown that evil seed in our own hearts and are
now force-feeding each other its bitter fruits – terrorism, corruption, crime, exploitation – all
due to fighting with each other for the world’s resources, which are God’s inheritance for us.
The Ramayana gives us a glimpse of true heroism, of selfless love and of selfish lust. Lord Rama
and His consort Sita are the eternal hero and heroine. Hanuman, the godly hero, personifies the
tendency to selflessly assist the Lord in His divine love, wheras Ravana, the godless villain,
personifies the tendency to selfishly grab the Lord’s property for our own
lust. The godly hero aspires to enjoy with God, whereas the godless villain wants to enjoy like
God.
On the other hand, in a typical movie, all the protagonists – the hero, the heroine and the villain
– have the same evil mentality of wanting to enjoy without caring for God. In the hero and
heroine, that mindset is masked in the guise of romance, whereas in the villain, it is expressed
without reservation. But they are all Ravanas; the difference is merely in the shades of black.
Our selfish attempts to be imitation heroes and heroines – whether in the movies or in real life –
are intrinsically evil and they fuel and fan all the greater evils that we dread. Ultimately our evil
boomerangs on us, for it perpetuates the illusion of our bodily misidentification and our body
subjects us to the tortures of old age, disease, death and rebirth – again and again and again.
Of course we can all be heroes too – in service to the supreme hero, like Hanuman.
Unfortunately our society portrays the Ravana tendency as heroic and the Hanuman propensity
as obsolete. The festival of Dusserha commemorates the ultimate defeat of Ravana and reminds
us of the destiny that awaits our society, if it continues in its godless selfishness.
But Dusserha is also a festival of hope and joy. The destruction of Ravana teaches us that the
Lord is competent to destroy the evil within and without. The same Lord Rama who destroyed
Ravana millennia ago has re-appeared as His Holy Name to destroy the Ravana within the hearts
of people. The holy name offers us real happiness – not by imitating God, but by loving God. So
this Dusserha let us not be content with burning lifeless effigies of Ravana; let us also burn with
the purifying fire of the holy names the living Ravana in our own hearts.

Real Ravana





                                                    DESTROY THE RAVANA WITHIN
The basic storyline of Ramayana is very similar to that of a typical
movie. Both feature a hero, a heroine and a villain; both depict the
villain lusting for the heroine; both delineate an exciting confrontation
between the hero and the villain, culminating in the destruction of the
villain and re-union of the hero and the heroine. However, there is one
vital difference – in the movie, the hero, the heroine and the villain are
all actually villains.
Many people think of a villain as a person who enjoys by exploiting and
harming others. Though not wrong, this conception of evil is incomplete
and naïve as it ignores a fundamental reality: our supremely responsible
and loving father God. Probably most of us never got spiritual education
to realize that it is God who selflessly provides us our daily food. It is true that we have to work
hard to earn our living, but our effort is secondary; its like the hard work of the birds searching
for grains. Without God pre-providing the grains through nature, their search, no matter how
painstaking, would be fruitless. Similarly without God pre-designing the miraculous mechanism of
photosynthesis which transforms “mud into mangoes” (a feat far beyond the best scientist and
the latest computer), we would never have any food, no matter how much we labored. All our
other necessities – heat, light, air, water, health – are similarly fulfilled – primarily by divine
arrangement, secondarily by human endeavor.
Unfortunately our education, media and culture preoccupy us with so many materialistic
allurements that we become blinded to the fact of our dependence and obligation to God. Fear
of God is the beginning of wisdom, just as healthy fear of a loving father is necessary for a
naughty restless child to become disciplined and responsible. And love of God is the culmination
of wisdom, just as gratitude and love for a benevolent father shows the maturity of a grown-up
son. Sadly however our society fosters neither love nor fear for God, but glamorizes godless
selfish materialism instead. Consequently nowadays many people are extremely selfish in their
relationship with God; they don’t give even a few moments to the person who has given them
their entire life. In a family, if a son doesn’t care for his father, who is his connecting link with
his brothers, very soon he will stop caring for them too. In fact he may even become malevolent
toward them because they become his competitors for inheritance. Similarly selfishness
towards God is the origin of all evil. We have all sown that evil seed in our own hearts and are
now force-feeding each other its bitter fruits – terrorism, corruption, crime, exploitation – all
due to fighting with each other for the world’s resources, which are God’s inheritance for us.
The Ramayana gives us a glimpse of true heroism, of selfless love and of selfish lust. Lord Rama
and His consort Sita are the eternal hero and heroine. Hanuman, the godly hero, personifies the
tendency to selflessly assist the Lord in His divine love, wheras Ravana, the godless villain,
personifies the tendency to selfishly grab the Lord’s property for our own
lust. The godly hero aspires to enjoy with God, whereas the godless villain wants to enjoy like
God.
On the other hand, in a typical movie, all the protagonists – the hero, the heroine and the villain
– have the same evil mentality of wanting to enjoy without caring for God. In the hero and
heroine, that mindset is masked in the guise of romance, whereas in the villain, it is expressed
without reservation. But they are all Ravanas; the difference is merely in the shades of black.
Our selfish attempts to be imitation heroes and heroines – whether in the movies or in real life –
are intrinsically evil and they fuel and fan all the greater evils that we dread. Ultimately our evil
boomerangs on us, for it perpetuates the illusion of our bodily misidentification and our body
subjects us to the tortures of old age, disease, death and rebirth – again and again and again.
Of course we can all be heroes too – in service to the supreme hero, like Hanuman.
Unfortunately our society portrays the Ravana tendency as heroic and the Hanuman propensity
as obsolete. The festival of Dusserha commemorates the ultimate defeat of Ravana and reminds
us of the destiny that awaits our society, if it continues in its godless selfishness.
But Dusserha is also a festival of hope and joy. The destruction of Ravana teaches us that the
Lord is competent to destroy the evil within and without. The same Lord Rama who destroyed
Ravana millennia ago has re-appeared as His Holy Name to destroy the Ravana within the hearts
of people. The holy name offers us real happiness – not by imitating God, but by loving God. So
this Dusserha let us not be content with burning lifeless effigies of Ravana; let us also burn with
the purifying fire of the holy names the living Ravana in our own hearts.

Its real life,what I really means…


IIMA

Food,pleasure enjoyment  is available to anyone and everyone; IIM-A
education to only a select few. Similarly bodily pleasures –
food, sleep, sex and show of strength – are available to all
species of life; divine joys to humans alone.
Just as the non-performing IIM-A student is expelled and loses
the chance for a bright career, spiritually lackadaisical souls
are expelled from human bodies back to animal bodies,
where they have no access to spiritual bliss. And just as an
irresponsible IIM-A student will never feel satisfied and always
feel guilty, similarly spiritually irresponsible humans never
feel fulfilled and always feel a vacuum in their hearts. The
Bhagavad-gita (16.23) therefore declares that a godless
materialist finds happiness neither in the next life, nor in
this. On the other hand, just as the IIM-A student who applies
himself to studies soon experiences the refined pleasure of
learning, those humans who apply themselves to chanting
the names of God soon relish the sublime pleasure of
devotion. Let us therefore wisely reject the lure of selfdeluding
enjoyment and fully utilize our human potential to
attain sublime happiness in this life and the next

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Life Without FEAR


 Fearlessness
Have you seen how peacefully a child sleeps in the lap of his
parent, even in a noisy, crowded local train? The hustle-bustle
disturbs everyone, but not the child – due to his implicit faith
in the protection of his parent.
All of us strive diligently to overcome our many fears –
financial, familial, social, academic and physical. However the
necessary security measures like insurances, helmets, buzzer
alarms, health checkups fail to free us from a disconcerting sense of insecurity within us. Why?
The Vedic texts explain that all fear originates in an unbalanced, unrealistic material conception
of life. The material aspect of our life has its importance; we need to feed, clothe, house and
provide for ourselves and our loved ones. However Krishna explain in the Bhagavad-gita (16.10)
that when we seek our sense of identity, self-worth, security and pleasure exclusively from our
material positions and possessions, we open ourselves to fear. Because the material realm is
characterized by constant, unpredictable changes, which often threaten to destroy or harm
whatever is dear to us. We prepare ourselves to face some of the small, predictable and
controllable changes, but still we consciously or subconsciously dread the huge, unpredictable and
uncontrollable changes. Is there any way to overcome this deep-rooted fear?
The more things change, the more we need to embrace the things that don’t change. The
Bhagavad Gita (2.14) describes, “Of the material, there is no endurance and of the spiritual there
is no cessation.” Beyond the stage of material activity that preoccupies our mind lies a vast,
unexplored realm of spiritual tranquility. We are spiritual beings, souls, originally from a spiritual
world, the kingdom of God, who is our eternal loving father. Currently we are occupying material
bodies and inhabiting this material world. The more we harmonize with our spiritual nature, the
more we become fearless. Understanding that we are, at our core, spiritual and, hence
indestructible, fills us with an unshakeable self-security; we recognize that worldly upheavals that
affect our material assets have no power whatsoever to hurt us. Moreover, understanding that a
benevolent God is ultimately orchestrating all material happenings helps us to see order amidst
change, plan amidst chaos.
The most practical and potent technology to equip ourselves with steady vision of this spiritual
reality is divine sound. By chanting the bona fide holy names of God like the name of Allah,Christ,Hare Krishna mantra,
we progressively experience both our own spiritual identity and God’s the protective presence and
guidance in our life. The more we enrich our faith by chanting, the more our devotion for Krishna
increases. And when we make our life’s work a devotional offering for His service, we focus more
on the object of our service – God and not its fruit – the immediate material result. This shift of
focus releases large reserves of mental energy, which are choked by our worry about the future.
Chanting gives us the calmness to see that almost all fears are more perceived than experienced.
The more we become free from fear of the future, the more we can fully absorb ourselves in our
present duties. Thus spiritual principles and practices empower us to access and utilize even our
material talents better and execute even our material duties better. Ultimately spirituality is the
only way to conquer the greatest of all fears – death. For a mature devotee, death is not a fearful
termination of existence, but a joyful reunion with God in His everlasting abode. Therefore just
as the child stays peaceful amidst chaos, let us become tranquil amidst ups and downs by
empowering ourselves with spiritual devotion.

To convey our Ideal it must first mingle with life. . .


The outer life is an exact reproduction of the inner. The spritiual life plays a tremendous part in the world. We may be attracted by flower & long to keep it always,but we can’t possess it if we sever it from its root. In the same way,we cannot be truly living,if our consciousness is cut off from its source. . .